'Biotopes' 2019

All work by Mathew Rimmer unless annotated otherwise. Photography by Alexander Hoyles

'Biotopes' function for nature by extending aquatic ecosystems, offering  real estate that provides a window into the terrestrial realm.

'Biotopes' 2019
'Biotopes' 2019
'Biotopes' 2019
'Biotopes' 2019
'Biotopes' 2019
'Biotopes' 2019
'Biotopes' 2019
'Biotopes' 2019
'Biotopes' 2019

Plants: Vallisneria, Micranthemum Monte Carlo, Rotala green, Vesicularia ferriei, Hornwort.

Viridescent Epiphyte installation
Viridescent Epiphyte installation
Viridescent Epiphyte installation
'Upside-Down Water' 2018
'Upside-Down Water' 2018

'Upside-Down Water' functioned as a filter for 'Biotopes' during this exhibition. The collision of the media generates a bacterial life cycle, maintaining healthy water conditions and aiding the nitrogen cycle in converting ammonia into nitrates and nitrates into nitrites.

'Upside-Down Water' 2018
'Untitled Globe' 2019.
'Untitled Globe' 2019
'Untitled Globe' 2019
'Untitled Globe' 2019
'Untitled Globe' 2019
'Untitled Globe' 2019
Viridescent Epiphyte installation
BRIG_VIRI_MATT-151578274636110.jpg
'Little Cube' 2020.
'Little Cube' 2020
Viridescent Epiphyte installation
BRIG_VIRI_MATT-231578274636111.jpg

Collaborative sculpture with Emma Hislop

Within this demijohn is a self sustained ecosystem. Live yeast consumes sugar, a reaction that produces co2 which is fed through tubes to the live plants in this exhibition, helping them to grow. This artificial process speaks of our contribution to greenhouse gasses, which also effects how plants grow.

BRIG_VIRI_MATT-191578274636111.jpg
'Contained Organism in Airport' 2019
poster 1.jpg
poster 2.jpg
poster 3.jpg

© 2020 By Matthew Rimmer

'Upside-Down Water' 2018. Acrylic, fluidised media, wave makers and water, 50 × 40 × 40 cm.